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Cross-posted on Physics.SE.

It makes sense that something like grain-oriented electrical steel would have good magnetic properties (e.g., magnetic permeability). I'm envisioning magnetic field lines being guided by regularly arranged atoms.

I understand, however, that amorphous steel can also have good magnetic properties. How is this possible without a crystalline structure in the metal?

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 and welcome to our new community! Thank you for contributing your question here, and we hope to see much more of you in the future !!! I'm curious how you found this site? Did you just type "materials.stackexchange.com" to see if there was an SE for the study of materials? $\endgroup$ Feb 10, 2023 at 22:55
  • $\begingroup$ Yes I found the community through a google search -- I posted this question in the physics community but was left wondering if it was better suited to folks with materials expertise $\endgroup$ Feb 10, 2023 at 23:36
  • $\begingroup$ What did you search on Google? I'm curious how people find us, because we changed our name. $\endgroup$ Feb 10, 2023 at 23:37
  • $\begingroup$ I think the goog search just let me to some page on meta that had all the boards and I saw this site on that list; question, by the way, has been answered on physics. $\endgroup$ Feb 11, 2023 at 22:48

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Answer by Ján Lalinský that was accepted by OP on Physics.SE:

"Amorphous means positions of atoms are random. But this still allows for aligned magnetic moments. Then for magnetization it does not matter where the atoms are, only that their moments are aligned."

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