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I need the source code (written in C programming language) for the following book:

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The Page-xiii of the book says:

Software availability
Readers interested in downloading the software described in this book in a computer-readable form for personal, noncommercial use should visit the Cambridge University Press web site at http://uk.cambridge.org, where the home page for this book and the software can be found; a listing of the programs included in the software package appears in the Appendix. Additional material related to the book, as well as contact information, can be found at the author’s website – http://www.ph.biu.ac.il/~rapaport.

None of the supplied URLs work as intended. Both are invalid URLs.

This link seems to be the page for the book. However, I haven't found the source code.

Where can I find the source code from the book "The Art of Molecular Dynamics Simulation"?

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    $\begingroup$ Take a look at this Github repository as it claims it contains the source code of that book. $\endgroup$
    – Camps
    May 22, 2023 at 19:15
  • $\begingroup$ @Camps, The source code was supposed to be in C, not it Python. The GitHub repository contains python code. $\endgroup$
    – user366312
    May 22, 2023 at 20:53
  • $\begingroup$ This repo has code written in C. And the description says it is based on the book. $\endgroup$ May 22, 2023 at 21:12
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    $\begingroup$ Another one with limited description, but all C code. $\endgroup$
    – Tyberius
    May 23, 2023 at 0:17

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Thankfully WaybackMachine archived a copy of the Art of Molecular Dynamics Website.

In this link, you can find the C source code associated with the book, with the following information stated along with it.

The software that appears in the book is available for personal use; the software is available here in tar+gzip and zip formats (please contact the author if you have difficulty retrieving the software or questions regarding its use).

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