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I used Autodock Vina and UCSF Chimera to perform blind and targeted docking on a protein from the RCSB database and a molecule I had optimized with Gaussian software.The results are as follows:
The targeted docking:

Score= [-6,1 to -5,5], RMSD I.b=[0 to 2,892], RMSD U.b=[0 to 7,275].

The blind docking:
Score= [-7,1 to -6,1], RMSD I.b=[0 to 2,343], RMSD U.b=[0 to 3,565].

The results of blind docking indicate that the ligand is attracted to the protein outside the target docking box.
Does this mean that the ligand can't interact with the protein in the target docking region or box? Can I consider the results of the targeted docking while also considering the results of the blind docking?

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If you already know where the active site of your protein is, there is no need to run a blind docking. Because the ligand binds to the protein, it doesn't imply that it can have any inhibitory action.

If you run blind docking, it is supposed that all the target surfaces are available, and all of them need to be inside the search box. If your ligand got bound to the protein outside the target docking box, you can always do another run with the smallest box just around the region you obtained from the first run. About the second question, look for the biochemistry of the target protein. The site where your ligand bond is important to protein activity? The binding induces modifications in the active site of the protein (closing/opening it) or in the co-factor area (if any)?.

Again, not because a ligan bound to the surface of the protein has any biochemistry importance.

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