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The purpose is for me to develop a deeper understanding of speech production and how distinct features that identify a phenome are produced.

ab initio models based on classical & statistical mechanics are preferable.

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    $\begingroup$ Before downvoting it would be nice if the issue was pointed out: is the question not clear or does it belong in another network or is it a duplicate or something else. That helps with getting an answer. Simply downvoting with no other interaction makes these websites that much more useless. $\endgroup$
    – MarcelineH
    Apr 26 at 11:17
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The paper bellow can give you some insides. Using a Computer Tomography recording, they build a 3D model for computer simulation using FEM (Finite Element Method) and then do a 3D printing.

The article:
T. Vampola, J. Horáček, V. Radolf, J. G. Švec, and A. Laukkanen, Influence of nasal cavities on voice quality: Computer simulations and experiments, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 148 3218-3231 (2020) DOI: 10.1121/10.0002487

The abstract:

Nasal cavities are known to introduce antiresonances (dips) in the sound spectrum reducing the acoustic power ofthe voice. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the vocal tract (VT) of one femalesubject was created for vowels [a:] and [i:] without and with a detailed model of nasal cavities based on CT(Computer Tomography) images. The 3D FE models were then used for analyzing the resonances, antiresonancesand the acoustic pressure response spectra of the VT. The computed results were compared with the measurementsof a VT model for the vowel [a:], obtained from the FE model by 3D printing. The nasality affects mainly the lowestformant frequency and decreases its peak level. The results confirm the main effect of nasalization, i.e., that soundpressure level decreases in the frequency region of the formantsF1–F2and emphasizes the frequency region of theformantsF3–F5around the singer’s formant cluster. Additionally, many internal local resonances in the nasal andparanasal cavities were found in the 3D FE model. Their effect on the acoustic output was found to be minimal, butaccelerometer measurements on the walls of the 3D-printed model suggested they could contribute to structure vibra-tions.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. This is along the lines of what I am looking for $\endgroup$
    – MarcelineH
    Apr 27 at 0:54
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    $\begingroup$ J Malinen has also worked on this problem for a long time, see e.g. asa.scitation.org/doi/full/10.1121/1.5095250 $\endgroup$ Apr 29 at 21:06
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, came across J Malinen's work in 'related' sections. $\endgroup$
    – MarcelineH
    Apr 30 at 0:50

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