5
$\begingroup$

When using gnuplot scripts to generate graphs in PDF format, there is the size option. I would like to know how one can estimate the right size of the output graph to place in a scientific paper.

$\endgroup$
4
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Documentation for pdfcairo, for pdf. $\endgroup$
    – Anyon
    Sep 11 at 15:09
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Meta discussion relevant to this question: mattermodeling.meta.stackexchange.com/q/291/671 $\endgroup$
    – Anyon
    Sep 11 at 16:27
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Normally, I output the graphs to PDF in a A4 size. The final figure size, I tailored in the LaTeX document. $\endgroup$
    – Camps
    Sep 15 at 16:55
  • $\begingroup$ Good idea @Camps $\endgroup$
    – Chi Kou
    Sep 15 at 22:17
4
$\begingroup$

I think Camps has the right idea here: Make the image with gnuplot as large as you need, then scale the size down in whatever program you are using to write your paper.

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

Output to a large size with a lot of whitespace (A4 is usually fine) and then trim the whitespace using pdfcrop, a command line tool included in every latex distribution. See this great answer Pdfcrop is really reliable, so I do this for all my PDF graphics before I put them in my papers so tex can handle them consistently and I don't end up with weird tiny figures surrounded by whitespace.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.