19

I just joined this community to answer you after I've randomly seen your post, because I think there are a couple of important variables you may want to consider: your feelings and your intuition. You can rationally consider many variables, but you are very young and there may be topics that you like now that you will consider boring in the future, and the ...


13

As someone who did his undergrad in Canada, PhD in UK, and acquired post-PhD research experience in Japan, Singapore, USA, Germany, and again in Canada: I can say that the dilemma you're facing is a major disadvantage of the undergrad UK system. The UK system has many advantages too! But the flexibility is better in other countries such as Canada and US. ...


12

As a Bachelor in Physics that do research in Material Science and in Drug Development, I have to recommend you to go for the Physics degree. Also, you have to be aware about the type/specialization of the Physics course. For example, my undergrad Physics course was focused in Solid State, so, we had Quantum Mechanics, Solid State Physics and Crystallographic,...


11

I'm a fellow Brit who did Chemistry as a first Degree, before moving into a hybrid chemistry/statistics PhD and now works as a software engineer. My suggestion is not to get too caught up in the exact subject that you are studying and consider the areas you are enjoying the most and find the course that fits your interests, regardless of course title. A good ...


10

An Engineer's perspective: I started with a Bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering, and then moved to a Master's in Materials Science and Engineering. Worked for 4 years in the industry, and now came back to do a PhD in Materials Engineering. If I could go back, I would definitely do the same thing, but maybe invest more time in Physics along the way. Basic ...


9

I studied physics and three of my family members studied chemistry. Don't worry too much about the choice. Any of those subjects will provide you with interesting study and enough career opportunities. Any scientific subject gets more interesting the harder you look at it (even Biology). You don't need lots of career opportunities, you only need a few. ...


9

I'm not working in material sciences but as a (particle) physicist I came into touch with solid physicists a lot. To elaborate: In particle physics, one of the main components is usually the scintillator crystal which is a very high advanced material. The material for it for an upcoming particle accelerator was entirely researched by our neighbour working ...


6

For Molecular Mechanics Allen & Tildesley. One of two molecular mechanics bibles. They have a github accounts with a ton of python and fortran codes Frenkel & Smit, and they have fortran 90 code that you can find. A solid reference book. D. C. Rapaport The Art of Molecular Simulation. Plenty of codes, written in C. Andrew Leach Molecular ...


6

I think one thing missing from other commenters here is the fact that your university and PhD concentration diminishes in importance and relevance as you get older. This begins almost immediately out of your PhD. Nowadays, a successful researcher will work inside a highly interdisciplinary team and pick up skills in additional areas. You'll start out ...


6

I think Natural Sciences could be a good fit for you. I studied almost the same A Levels you did and couldn't decide whether I preferred Physics or Chemistry. Studying Natural Sciences allowed me to take courses in both, and to choose the areas I liked most and leave out the ones I didn't It's worth bearing in mind that these subjects change in content when ...


6

Being great at what you like doing will open far more doors for you. You will find that there is a lot more variety of jobs than you think, and you will find interesting opportunities by being at the top of your field. It sounds like you will really excel at chemistry, and being in a field you are excited about is a lot better (Personal satisfaction and for ...


5

I was in the same position as you 3 years ago! I liked chemistry the most and physics the second, but my dad is a physicist so he wanted me to study physics. I ended up choosing chemistry because math was never my strong point. My family eventually accepted me studying chemistry. I think what really matters is whether you can see yourself studying only the ...


4

I would take a total different approach to solving this. Rather than focusing on the topics and their relative difficulty etc. Try to envision a hard problem that you want to solve and work on for a long time and from that point of view you find the skills needed to solve that challenge. Eg., be problem focused rather than solution focused. It's a similar ...


4

I disagree with the statement by Tyberius that: "Bond order isn't terribly useful to a computationalist directly; however, it can be invaluable for translating Quantum Mechanical results into a framework thats readily understood by experimentalists.". Bond order quantifies the number of electrons that are shared (technically, 'dressed exchanged') ...


3

First-principles (ab initio) materials simulation: Here is an online course: http://compmatphys.epotentia.com/ Description: It is possible to predict properties of materials “from scratch” or “ab initio”: by applying the laws of quantum physics to the atoms that make up the material. The methods for doing this have been developed by solid state physicists,...


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