8

At least in the example you picked up to illustrate your question, the key to the answer might be here: "The a axis, perpendicular to the chains in the structure, is the magnetic easy axis, while the chain axis direction, along b, is the hard axis." This means that the effectively infinite magnetic moments corresponding to each infinite one-dimensional ...


7

1D A famous example of a nearly ideal spin-$1/2$ isotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain (1D) system is copper pyrazine dinitrate [Cu(C$_4$H$_4$N$_2$)(NO$_3$)$_2$], which was discussed in Hammar et al. Phys. Rev. B 59, 1008 (1999) [arXiv link]. Another excellent realizations include KCuF$_3$, which has stronger (but still low) interchain coupling, and ...


5

I have not read the paper your linked to in detail, but I can offer some general answers to your questions. ...there exists quasi-one-dimensional ferromagnetic materials attributing its long range magnetic order stability to magnetic anisotropy... (emphasis added) We're talking about quasi-1D materials. Usually this means that it's a 3D crystal ...


4

Actual examples of 2D magnetic systems are MXenes and metal-organic adsorption monolayers.


2

The Heisenberg formalism is often used to describe the interaction between molecules adsorbed on a surface (2D) using a cluster expansion. This has nothing to do with magnetism, but the mathematical framework is suitable for this kind of problem. Please take a look at Nielsen et al. J. Chem. Phys. 139 (2013) 224706. The application of the Heisenberg ...


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